Giving Tuesday - NAmibian lion trust- Lion Guards

Namibian Lion Trust Lion Guards are out in the field, doing what they do best – protecting lions and other large carnivores from persecution, also supporting the farmer whose livelihood is, at times, threatened by these conflict species. 

This past year has been tough on man and beast alike, with COVID and the devastating drought  – now into its 9th year – taking its toll.  

We would like to show our gratitude to the men and women who dedicate their days and nights to the Namibian Lion Trust & Namibia’s Lions –  

Thank YOU for your support.

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NLT Lion Guard

Uezekandavi Nguezeeta, fondly known as Kandavi, joined the Namibian Lion Trust as a Lion Guard in 2015. He patrols an area of approx. 80 km2, adjacent to the Hobatere, an extension to the west of the Etosha National Park. Mostly on foot, Kandavii covers vast areas of inhospitable terrain, mitigating conflict between livestock farmers, lion and other large carnivores.
His determination to protect Conservancy wildlife, especially the Hobatere lions when they follow the Hartmann’s Zebra herds out of the safety of the Park onto neighbouring farmland, is commendable.
Kandavi has watched the Hobatere lioness named Ai, raise two sets of cubs; she recently shifted her home range onto communal farmland adjacent to this Protected Area, making his commitment to protecting her & her offspring from farmer retaliation, all the more challenging.

Uezekandavi Nguezeeta

NLT Lion Guard

“I love to see the lion cubs in our Conservancy, as this shows me that our lions are healthy” – NLT senior Lion Guard, Jackson Kavetu.
Jackson became a Conservancy Game Guard when he was a young man and has been a dedicated lion conservationist ever since. He joined the Namibian Lion Trust in 2012. As a First Responder when calls for support come in from the field, his passion for wildlife protection motivates him to do all he can, to minimize conflict between farmers and carnivores.
Married, with three school-going children, Jackson farms goats on communal land close to Etosha’s border. His successful livestock protection methods are testimony to the efficacy of the Namibian Lion Trust’s practical, workable systems.

Jackson Kavetu

NLT Lion Guard

Katirire (Titus) Turitjo farms on communal land close to the Etosha National Park western border, where he and his family have lost livestock to predators that leave the confines of the Park.
“I feel good about my job as a Lion Guard because it gives me more knowledge on how to farm, protect my livestock and how to educate my Community”.
Titus patrols his vast area on horseback, often spending nights out in the field, where lion and spotted hyaena, especially, roam opportunistically in search of easy prey.

Katirire (Titus) Turitjo

NLT Lion Guard

Naphatalie Awarab: As a child, Naphtalie remembers the challenges of farming livestock in areas where wildlife such as lion and elephant, abound. His family’s cattle, goats & donkeys fell prey to predators that leave the Etosha National Park.
Naphtalie’s knowledge of the natural world gained as a young herdsman, is an asset to the Namibian Lion Trust as is his passion for mechanics and brickwork.
He has three children, the youngest is Ivan, who is in grade 5 and hopes to become a pilot once he completes his schooling.

Naphatalie Awarab

Namibian Lion Trust staff

Dorien Kharuxas: ‘I graduated from high school in December 2018, two years later I was employed by the Namibian Lion Trust as Office Administrator. My work has become my passion as I now know how important it is to monitor lion movement and to support our Lion Guards in the field with information and the daily programme – trying to prevent conflict by warning farmers to protect their livestock, is my most valuable role.
As a young mother of our beautiful daughter, Zinorida, I am lucky to have a loving family where my mother takes care of her and my brother’s daughter, Rasia. I care about their future and would like to share what I have learned with my community so that we may learn to live closer to nature’.

Dorien Kharuxas

NLT Lion Guard

Renoveni Tjauira joined our team in 2019 and is proud of his role as Lion Guard in Omatendeka Conservancy, one of the most pro-active in lion conservation. Despite high livestock losses to predation, his Conservancy believes in the protection of all wildlife, also conflict species such as elephant and predators.
His dedication to protecting lions from persecution became clear when he helped weigh a male lion during a collaring exercise. “Touching that sleeping lion changed the way I see them today”. Renoveni never misses an opportunity to patrol his area, diligently completing his monitoring and data collection forms.
Renoveni is well-liked by his peers and has shown great leadership potential during Lion Guard Training Courses.

Renoveni Tjauira

NLT Lion Guard

Hoveka Undari: “Every day I speak to my family to conserve the Lion because it is very important for our future generations to see and know about the Lion, so that they may not just hear or read about them one day in old books, like we do about Dinosaurs. I am a family-man, married to Jaturapi for 10 years and we have 5 children.
The Lion is very important in our area, the Omatendeka Conservancy. I am a committee member and am proud to be able to serve my community in important conservation decisions”.

Hoveka Undari

NLT Lion Guard

Lazarus Hoxobeb: The most senior Lion Guard, Lazarus, is a member of the #Khoa di //Hoas Conservancy and farms on communal land with his wife, Odilie, along the southern boundary of the Hobatere Concession, a wildlife protected area managed as part of the Etosha National Park.
He joined the Namibian Lion Trust in December 2019, but also represents the /Gaio Daman Traditional Authority at Conservancy level.
“One of my dreams was to work with lions, and now I actively try to prevent Human-Wildlife Conflict and to protect these vulnerable Big Cats”.

Lazarus Hoxobeb

NLT Lion Guard

Barman Guim’s love for the elusive Black Rhino that survives in this inhospitable, semi-arid Kunene, is luckily shared with the few lions that are also found in this habitat.
The Grootberg Plateau lies at approx. 1600 m, the edges eroded into rivers over millions of years, are the lifeblood for wildlife, providing food for lions and other predators. This treacherous yet unique landscape is Barman’s ‘backyard’, his instinctive knowledge invaluable when monitoring lions.
Barman & his wife Marianna, farm on communal land in the Grootberg area, their children almost done with school take every opportunity, gaining experience from their father, to join on patrols.

Barman Guim

Kanisius Kenahama: “My work with the Namibian Lion Trust allows me to Live my passion for nature and to STOP the killing of lions”.
Kanu, as we all know him, is a registered Tour Guide, also an accredited Hunting Guide, with 15 years’ experience as a tracker. His knowledge of animal behaviour and his ability to identify the known lions is invaluable when on field trips with his team. His loyalty to the Trust is remarkable.
During the Lion Ranger Training, Kanu shows compassion for the farmers’ plight but is steadfast in his belief that the lion should enjoy greater protection from retaliation, supporting stricter Law Enforcement.
He has two young children, also taking care of his elderly parents.

Kanisius Kenahama

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